Author: John Van Camp (John Van Camp)

Go Big, Open Strong!
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Go Big, Open Strong!

"When they think of huge openings, many people think of me" So says Hedwig, the transsexual East German rock star in John Cameron Mitchell's wonderful redemption story Hedwig and the Angry Inch.

SOL Still Our Lions
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SOL Still Our Lions

Gary Evan’s SOL is a deep-dive into the history of the Detroit Lions like no other. He has written an utterly unique account of the unlucky team and the city they represent and seem to reflect directly.

The Importance of Word Order
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The Importance of Word Order

Almost all music fans have heard the classic love song "I Only Have Eyes For You." Its title and refrain both leverage "only" the way it's typically used in conversational English, even though its placement in the sentence renders a meaning that is probably not what the songwriter intended.

Using Liminality to Add Depth to Your Writing
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Using Liminality to Add Depth to Your Writing

Liminality is the state between what was and what has not yet come to pass. It gets its name from the Latin word “limen,” meaning “threshold.” Although it was a prominent trope in medieval literature, world literature describes a similar power in this state of transition.

Movies and Plays: What’s It All About?
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Movies and Plays: What’s It All About?

It’s quite likely that you’ll have the opportunity to review movies and plays in your writing career. The two story-telling art forms are as closely related as first cousins and have influenced each other since the days of silent film

Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief Review
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Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief Review

The Percy Jackson and the Olympians series by Rick Riordan is often overlooked. But when your primary competitor is J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter, aka the best-selling series of all time, is there really anyone to blame? Most middle-grade readers had their sights set exclusively on the Harry Potter series in the early 2000s.

Try, and Avoid “Try and”
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Try, and Avoid “Try and”

Like rodents getting into seemingly impenetrable buildings, colloquialisms have a way of sneaking into many pieces of otherwise respectable writing. Among the most common is the phrase “try and . . .” as in “Try and start the car” or “Try and win the game.”